Posts tagged "Native American"

beyondbuckskin:

OG Landlords Women’s Tee

This cool tee comes to us from the creative mind of Jeremy Arviso, who heads up his clothing company Noble Savage.
It is an ode to those warriors and chiefs who were the great leaders the Indigenous inhabitants of what is now the USA. They were the Original Landlords.
“What is Noble Savage? It’s an oxymoron we feel is appropriate to describe life we as a brand are living. Our inspiration for what we do comes from the savage struggle and through that struggle we emerge noble. Clean design, quality garments and goods is our aim with every piece we create. Our tribe consists of many cultures and nations from around the World which will show in our products, for that we are grateful. Fashion fades, style is eternal.”

beyondbuckskin:

OG Landlords Women’s Tee

This cool tee comes to us from the creative mind of Jeremy Arviso, who heads up his clothing company Noble Savage.

It is an ode to those warriors and chiefs who were the great leaders the Indigenous inhabitants of what is now the USA. They were the Original Landlords.

“What is Noble Savage? It’s an oxymoron we feel is appropriate to describe life we as a brand are living. Our inspiration for what we do comes from the savage struggle and through that struggle we emerge noble. Clean design, quality garments and goods is our aim with every piece we create. Our tribe consists of many cultures and nations from around the World which will show in our products, for that we are grateful. Fashion fades, style is eternal.”


deluxvivens:

Nonexistent tumblr ndns: I present to you Native women that are hotter than a hipster girl in a headdress standing in a field.

(my SECOND attempt at doing captions.)


gaywrites:

In an election this week, Minnesota became the first state to elect an openly lesbian Native American woman to its legislature. 

Democrat Susan Allen will represent District 61B, which consists of 62 percent minorities. She’s proud of her diversity and says it will add to her work:

Earlier in her campaign, she noted, “I reflect the great diversity of our district, as a Native American woman and a member of the LGBT community, and hope to bring this important voice to the state capital to offer more balanced, representative contributions and input.”

Following her victory, Allen told Southwest Minneapolis Patch that she was eager to dive into legislative work. “My early priorities will be to bring jobs and job training to our district, work on a fair tax system for Minnesota and fight the discriminatory constitutional marriage amendment,” she said. 

Awesome! I’m sure we can expect great things from her. 


williwhite:




As a Native American, I constantly come across pictures of non-natives dressed in “indian” face. Feathers or headdresses adorn their heads, “war” paint splattered across their cheeks, and looks of stoic impersionations. These non-natives romanticize a perceived understanding of Native Americans from Hollywood films that neglect to showcase the modern Native. The present-day Native American who does not go to the mall wearing buck-skin, a headdress and paint on their face.Take a step back, do your homework. Enlighten yourself about cultures and the significance of a headdress, the sacredness of eagle feathers. Beat the stereotypes. Respect cultures. Special thanks to Kathleen Franco for allowing me to make her a stereotype, ie. the “bad” guy. She’s a wonderful human being and a great actress. And to Khloe Keeler for being my authenticly modern Native. You ladies rock! © 2011 William White IIWilli White Photography

williwhite:

As a Native American, I constantly come across pictures of non-natives dressed in “indian” face. Feathers or headdresses adorn their heads, “war” paint splattered across their cheeks, and looks of stoic impersionations. These non-natives romanticize a perceived understanding of Native Americans from Hollywood films that neglect to showcase the modern Native. The present-day Native American who does not go to the mall wearing buck-skin, a headdress and paint on their face.

Take a step back, do your homework. Enlighten yourself about cultures and the significance of a headdress, the sacredness of eagle feathers. Beat the stereotypes. Respect cultures. 


Special thanks to Kathleen Franco for allowing me to make her a stereotype, ie. the “bad” guy. She’s a wonderful human being and a great actress. And to Khloe Keeler for being my authenticly modern Native. You ladies rock! 

© 2011 William White II
Willi White Photography

selchieproductions:

[Image description: Portrait photo of Wenona Baldenegro]
© Navajo Times
Diné candidate: Time is right for Native in Congress
With Arizona redrawing its congressional districts, Wenona Benally Baldenegro figures it’s a good time to be throwing her hat in the ring.
The 34-year-old Harvard law grad, originally from Kayenta, thinks she stands a pretty good chance of winning the Democratic nomination and defeating Republican incumbent Paul Gosar - especially if the Navajo Nation and 10 other Arizona tribes can convince the state of Arizona to redraw District 1 their way.
If she is elected, it will be the first time Arizona has elected a Native American to Congress, and she will be the first Native woman to represent any state.
She thinks she stands a chance.
“If you look at the proposed district,” Baldenegro said in a phone interview between appointments Monday, “about 20 percent of the voters are Native American and another 20 percent are Hispanic.”
Thus, it will not hurt Baldenegro that she married a Mexican-American (Salomon F. Baldenegro) and has a Spanish last name - nor that she has expressed vehement opposition to Arizona’s ethnic studies bill and SB1070, which requires police to question individuals they suspect might be illegal immigrants (like her grandmother, who was rounded up in an Immigration Service raid on Northern Arizona University’s food service).
But Baldenegro, whose clans are Tsi’najinii (Black Streaked Wood), Honaghaahnii (One Wanders Around), Ta’neeszahnii (Tangle) and Tabaaha (Edge Water), is not running because she thinks she can get elected.
She’s running because, like many Americans, she’s tired of the polarized politics that have gridlocked Congress and she wants to do more than gripe about it.
“It’s time for the next generation of leaders to step up,” she said. “It’s time for a voice of reason at the federal level.”
In announcing her campaign last month, Baldenegro portrayed herself as a friend of working families and the middle class, whom she believes are being edged out of the flagging economy as the rich get richer.
But what does a Harvard-educated lawyer know about life at the bottom?
Well, plenty, as it turns out. Baldenegro’s parents, Raymond and Winnona Ann Benally, divorced when Baldenegro was in junior high, leaving her mother a single parent with only a high school diploma.
Not one to waste time whining, Winnona Benally immediately started working on a degree, ending up with not just a bachelor’s but a master’s in education.
“If I’m elected, one of my main priorities will be education,” Baldenegro said. “For people like me and my mom, it’s a way out and a way up.”
Her first priority, though, would be job creation - and she wants to specifically target the Navajo Nation.
“A lot of people in my generation want to come back to the reservation and be gainfully employed,” said Baldenegro, who currently lives in Flagstaff. “There are just no jobs for us.”
She’s also committed to “protecting those vital services that our people rely on to remain healthy and secure,” like Medicare, Medicaid and Social Security.
Baldenegro regards herself as a moderate environmentalist who believes in balancing the economy and the planet - but she’s definitely opposed to bringing uranium mining back to the Grand Canyon, and thinks the Navajo Nation even ought to look at phasing out its coal mines.
“To extract coal, it takes another vital resource - water,” she said. “We’re going to run out of water before we run out of coal.”
She’s a proponent of wind and solar power and other “sustainable” employment opportunities.
She’d also like to rebalance the tax code so that the wealthiest Americans pay more.
“You can see in the Occupy Wall Street movement that people are frustrated,” she said. “They’re tired of bailing out Wall Street. They’re tired of the budget being balanced on their backs while the rich don’t pay their fair share. They want someone in Congress who truly represents them, who will be their voice.”
Baldenegro graduated from Monument Valley High School in 1996 and went on to receive a bachelor’s in English literature at Arizona State University. After graduating, she worked for the Arizona Inter-Tribal Council, tracking the Indian Health Service budget and legislation that affected Native Americans.
“That’s what inspired me to go to law school,” she said.
It was her mother who inspired her to aim for the top and apply to Harvard.
“I figured if she could get a master’s while raising kids as a single parent, I could get into Harvard,” she said.
Baldenegro hopes her candidacy will inspire other young people coming up.
“I want them to know that you can be from the rez and still be anything you want to be,” she said. “Anything.”
Even, perhaps, the first Native American congresswoman.

selchieproductions:

[Image description: Portrait photo of Wenona Baldenegro]

© Navajo Times

Diné candidate: Time is right for Native in Congress

With Arizona redrawing its congressional districts, Wenona Benally Baldenegro figures it’s a good time to be throwing her hat in the ring.

The 34-year-old Harvard law grad, originally from Kayenta, thinks she stands a pretty good chance of winning the Democratic nomination and defeating Republican incumbent Paul Gosar - especially if the Navajo Nation and 10 other Arizona tribes can convince the state of Arizona to redraw District 1 their way.

If she is elected, it will be the first time Arizona has elected a Native American to Congress, and she will be the first Native woman to represent any state.

She thinks she stands a chance.

“If you look at the proposed district,” Baldenegro said in a phone interview between appointments Monday, “about 20 percent of the voters are Native American and another 20 percent are Hispanic.”

Thus, it will not hurt Baldenegro that she married a Mexican-American (Salomon F. Baldenegro) and has a Spanish last name - nor that she has expressed vehement opposition to Arizona’s ethnic studies bill and SB1070, which requires police to question individuals they suspect might be illegal immigrants (like her grandmother, who was rounded up in an Immigration Service raid on Northern Arizona University’s food service).

But Baldenegro, whose clans are Tsi’najinii (Black Streaked Wood), Honaghaahnii (One Wanders Around), Ta’neeszahnii (Tangle) and Tabaaha (Edge Water), is not running because she thinks she can get elected.

She’s running because, like many Americans, she’s tired of the polarized politics that have gridlocked Congress and she wants to do more than gripe about it.

“It’s time for the next generation of leaders to step up,” she said. “It’s time for a voice of reason at the federal level.”

In announcing her campaign last month, Baldenegro portrayed herself as a friend of working families and the middle class, whom she believes are being edged out of the flagging economy as the rich get richer.

But what does a Harvard-educated lawyer know about life at the bottom?

Well, plenty, as it turns out. Baldenegro’s parents, Raymond and Winnona Ann Benally, divorced when Baldenegro was in junior high, leaving her mother a single parent with only a high school diploma.

Not one to waste time whining, Winnona Benally immediately started working on a degree, ending up with not just a bachelor’s but a master’s in education.

“If I’m elected, one of my main priorities will be education,” Baldenegro said. “For people like me and my mom, it’s a way out and a way up.”

Her first priority, though, would be job creation - and she wants to specifically target the Navajo Nation.

“A lot of people in my generation want to come back to the reservation and be gainfully employed,” said Baldenegro, who currently lives in Flagstaff. “There are just no jobs for us.”

She’s also committed to “protecting those vital services that our people rely on to remain healthy and secure,” like Medicare, Medicaid and Social Security.

Baldenegro regards herself as a moderate environmentalist who believes in balancing the economy and the planet - but she’s definitely opposed to bringing uranium mining back to the Grand Canyon, and thinks the Navajo Nation even ought to look at phasing out its coal mines.

“To extract coal, it takes another vital resource - water,” she said. “We’re going to run out of water before we run out of coal.”

She’s a proponent of wind and solar power and other “sustainable” employment opportunities.

She’d also like to rebalance the tax code so that the wealthiest Americans pay more.

“You can see in the Occupy Wall Street movement that people are frustrated,” she said. “They’re tired of bailing out Wall Street. They’re tired of the budget being balanced on their backs while the rich don’t pay their fair share. They want someone in Congress who truly represents them, who will be their voice.”

Baldenegro graduated from Monument Valley High School in 1996 and went on to receive a bachelor’s in English literature at Arizona State University. After graduating, she worked for the Arizona Inter-Tribal Council, tracking the Indian Health Service budget and legislation that affected Native Americans.

“That’s what inspired me to go to law school,” she said.

It was her mother who inspired her to aim for the top and apply to Harvard.

“I figured if she could get a master’s while raising kids as a single parent, I could get into Harvard,” she said.

Baldenegro hopes her candidacy will inspire other young people coming up.

“I want them to know that you can be from the rez and still be anything you want to be,” she said. “Anything.”

Even, perhaps, the first Native American congresswoman.


cassket:

Trigger Warning: Racism, Racist stereotypes

For some, college learning comes in the form of classroom work, book reading, and late nights at the library. For others, it comes in the form of four years of public stupidity followed by confusion as to why people think you’re acting like a dickbag. The Duke University fraternity behind a recent Pilgrims and Indians themed party seems to fall into the latter category.

According to the Duke Chronicle, one student who was invited to the Pi Kappa Phi party wasn’t amused when she received an invitation, which read, in part,

In 1621 some crazy pilgrims had a pretty brutal harvest. Word on the street was they didn’t have enough food for half the bros in Plymouth. Then some hot natives came along with some extra food.… On Saturday, the brothers of Pi Kappa Phi will be honoring that party spirit. There will be a cornucopia of treats in our modern-day teepee. Tap into your inner pocahotness, wear a few feathers and party like you don’t care if you survive the winter.

(And this is the part where you’re supposed to imagine bros high fiving.)

It’s a formidable entry into the school’s ongoing and highly competitive Tucker Max Impersonation Contest if I’ve ever seen one, with bonus points for how grating it is when smart people try to write like how surfers in Disney channel movies talk.

In spite of her hesitation regarding the party’s theme, she attended anyway, and felt even more grossed out when she saw the costumes her fellow students were wearing. Based on her description, they sound like something from the cover of an indie rock album— white kids in feather headdresses, war paint, and faux buckskin, drinking firewater. Except they were smiling and taking shots rather than staring off into a big glowing triangle on the horizon.

After the party, the student, undergraduate Nicole Daniels, felt compelled to write an opinion piece in the campus newspaper. She writes,

This party was bigoted and racist, and such an event would never be tolerated if other races were involved. Would Duke students attend a “master and slave” themed party where guests were invited to wear blackface? How about a party where students dress up like Nazis and Jews? Surely these events would trigger student objection and national media attention, and rightfully so. Yet “Pilgrims and Indians” did not faze Duke University. Students dressed up for fun at the expense of Native Americans, a race that was exploited and exterminated for centuries. The only props missing from the party were smallpox-infected blankets.

I’m sure there were some blankets present at the party that did not escape becoming infected with something, but point taken. Native Americans were marginalized and erased like many ethnic groups throughout history, yet it’s pretty widely accepted that mocking and sexifying those groups is both tacky and awful. Why do otherwise intelligent people insist on clinging to their right to use “Native American” as a party theme?

She went on, arguing that reducing a wide range of people and culture to a fun, sexy costume and party idea reduces the people who are a part of that culture to characters.

Unsurprisingly, some students who commented on Daniels’s opinion piece saw nothing wrong with parties where invitees are invited to show up dressed as horny racial minorities. Some told her to lighten up and enjoy college instead of being a buzzkill mass murderer of fun. One commenter noted,

I think Nicole has a great point here—it is inappropriate to dress up as Native Americans because most costumes ultimately end up becoming ignorant stereotypes. Thanksgiving themed costume parties are wrong and insensitive, and they should not exist. However, the injustices don’t end there. I’ve heard of parties that encourage the attendees to comes dressed in 80s style clothing, and of course, the party goers show up in hyper-sexualized and largely uneducated costumes of people from the 1980’s and make a mockery of an entire generation. Much like the Native Americans did NOT have a monolithic culture, the people of the 1980’s were varied and only dressing in neon and tights is offensive.

Brilliant satire there and apt comparison if the 1980’s had concluded with a mass genocide of all members of the Brat Pack followed by a forced thousand mile March of the Valley Girls to Oklahoma. Try again.

Other students were supportive of Davis, lamenting the comments defending the party. If I were a Duke student, I’d lament the shit out of those comments, too; they’re part of a long tradition where one contingent of Blue Devils does their darndest to make the rest of the country think that all Blue Devils are douchebags.

Daniels emailed the president of the fraternity but, as of the writing of her opinion piece, had received no response.


“The cultural values of Native Americans are based on giving unconditionally and empowering those around them. Instead this cultural value is forgotten when negative stereotyping of Native people occurs.”

Jacqueline Johnson Pata (National Congress of American Indians) in response to Kris Jenner’s ‘indian giver’ comment.

Also: November= Native American Heritage Month

The Associated Press: Native American group slams Kardashian mom comment

(via orsf)


stfuconservatives:

Today in “Business as Usual For This Icky Mega-Corp,” Urban Outfitters is selling something appropriative and tasteless. Sign the petition here.

stfuconservatives:

Today in “Business as Usual For This Icky Mega-Corp,” Urban Outfitters is selling something appropriative and tasteless. Sign the petition here.


stogu:

Image Description: An image of an ?Enxet Indian? sitting on the ground. Four others stand around her.
selchieproductions:

Two decades of legal battles, but land at last© Survival International
After two decades of legal battles, Enxet Indians in Paraguay are to return to part of their ancestral land.
Around 90 Enxet families from central Paraguay won back the right to 14,000 hectares of their traditional lands in 2006.
But the companies that ‘owned’ the land, Kansol S.A. and Roswell & Company S.A., only signed an agreement to hand it back last month.
The Indians have been living next to a highway in central Paraguay under ‘sub-human conditions,’ according to the Inter-American Court on Human Rights.Nineteen members of the community, including children, have died as a result of the lack of medical and social care.
The court has asked Paraguay’s government to assign a fund of US $1,000,000 to help the community re-establish itself.
The Enxet’s struggle is emblematic of the arduous wait that many indigenous groups in Paraguay must endure to recover even small portions of their ancestral lands.
Much of the land in the South American country has been taken over by cattle ranchers for beef.
 

stogu:

Image Description: An image of an ?Enxet Indian? sitting on the ground. Four others stand around her.

selchieproductions:

Two decades of legal battles, but land at last
© Survival International

After two decades of legal battles, Enxet Indians in Paraguay are to return to part of their ancestral land.

Around 90 Enxet families from central Paraguay won back the right to 14,000 hectares of their traditional lands in 2006.

But the companies that ‘owned’ the land, Kansol S.A. and Roswell & Company S.A., only signed an agreement to hand it back last month.

The Indians have been living next to a highway in central Paraguay under ‘sub-human conditions,’ according to the Inter-American Court on Human Rights.

Nineteen members of the community, including children, have died as a result of the lack of medical and social care.

The court has asked Paraguay’s government to assign a fund of US $1,000,000 to help the community re-establish itself.

The Enxet’s struggle is emblematic of the arduous wait that many indigenous groups in Paraguay must endure to recover even small portions of their ancestral lands.

Much of the land in the South American country has been taken over by cattle ranchers for beef.

 

velocicrafter:

Simplicity Sewing patterns: costuming your racist ass since forever ago.

Obviously cultural appropriation is fashionable! 

velocicrafter:

Simplicity Sewing patterns: costuming your racist ass since forever ago.

Obviously cultural appropriation is fashionable! 


inofthisworld:

♥ᏒᏃᏱ♥: Submission: It’s not Native Americans’ job to teach White people about our culture

mycultureisnotatrend:

For the past 500 years we’ve been told our cultures were immoral and “savage”, our ancestors have been places in boarding schools to remove them from their…


wheredatfunkylovecatat:

Background (Preamble):On August 30, 2010, a partly Deaf Native American man, John T. Williams, was shot and killed by Officer Ian Birk of the Seattle police, after Williams was seen crossing Boren Avenue at Howell Street with a folding 3-inch carving knife and wooden board.Williams was standing 9 to 10 feet away when Officer Birk, a rookie officer with just two years of experience, stopped his cruiser, got out, and shouted orders at him to drop the knife three times before he fatally shot Williams in the chest four times. The confrontation lasted less than 1 minute.Williams was of the Ditidaht First Nation, a member nation of the Nuu-Chah-Nulth, and came from a long line of Indigenous American artists in the First Nations who carved wood. It is legal in Seattle to carry a 3 inch knife or shorter. Williams sold his small totem carvings at the Pike Place Market. It was widely known in the local community that Williams was deaf in one ear and had great difficulty in communicating with people. He was known to wear headphones or ear buds.After initial reports that Williams advanced on Officer Birk, the Seattle Police Department said they could no longer be sure that had occurred and Williams had not moved threateningly towards Officer Birk.The Seattle Police Department is now investigating but has released no information. The Seattle Police Department has been facing controversy in the aftermath of some recent brutality cases (cops abused a Hispanic suspect & called him “Mexican piss”, another incident where Seattle cops punched a 17 years old girl for jaywalking, not to mention 5 deaths in 1 week caused by Seattle cops).Here are some important facts:1. Williams was shot four times in the chest, which is brutal, excessive force.2. The confrontation lasted less than 1 minute.3. Officer Birks reacted too quickly.4. Williams was killed in the afternoon in broad daylight at 4.30 pm.5. Williams was partly deaf and unable to understand Officer Birk’s orders from 9 to 10 feet away.6. It has been a long-lasting established tradition for Native Americans to be carving wood on the streets of Seattle, which has a large Indigenous population. It’s not unusual for Native Americans to carry knives around in Seattle.William’s sudden, tragic death at the hands of the Seattle Police Department is a serious reminder that any Deaf person’s life could be in danger should a situation with the police ever arise.~~~~go and sign the petition, neh? http://www.gopetition.com/petition/38960.html

wheredatfunkylovecatat:

Background (Preamble):On August 30, 2010, a partly Deaf Native American man, John T. Williams, was shot and killed by Officer Ian Birk of the Seattle police, after Williams was seen crossing Boren Avenue at Howell Street with a folding 3-inch carving knife and wooden board.
Williams was standing 9 to 10 feet away when Officer Birk, a rookie officer with just two years of experience, stopped his cruiser, got out, and shouted orders at him to drop the knife three times before he fatally shot Williams in the chest four times. The confrontation lasted less than 1 minute.

Williams was of the Ditidaht First Nation, a member nation of the Nuu-Chah-Nulth, and came from a long line of Indigenous American artists in the First Nations who carved wood. It is legal in Seattle to carry a 3 inch knife or shorter. Williams sold his small totem carvings at the Pike Place Market. It was widely known in the local community that Williams was deaf in one ear and had great difficulty in communicating with people. He was known to wear headphones or ear buds.

After initial reports that Williams advanced on Officer Birk, the Seattle Police Department said they could no longer be sure that had occurred and Williams had not moved threateningly towards Officer Birk.

The Seattle Police Department is now investigating but has released no information. The Seattle Police Department has been facing controversy in the aftermath of some recent brutality cases (cops abused a Hispanic suspect & called him “Mexican piss”another incident where Seattle cops punched a 17 years old girl for jaywalking, not to mention 5 deaths in 1 week caused by Seattle cops).

Here are some important facts:

1. Williams was shot four times in the chest, which is brutal, excessive force.
2. The confrontation lasted less than 1 minute.
3. Officer Birks reacted too quickly.
4. Williams was killed in the afternoon in broad daylight at 4.30 pm.
5. Williams was partly deaf and unable to understand Officer Birk’s orders from 9 to 10 feet away.
6. It has been a long-lasting established tradition for Native Americans to be carving wood on the streets of Seattle, which has a large Indigenous population. It’s not unusual for Native Americans to carry knives around in Seattle.

William’s sudden, tragic death at the hands of the Seattle Police Department is a serious reminder that any Deaf person’s life could be in danger should a situation with the police ever arise.


~~~~
go and sign the petition, neh? 
http://www.gopetition.com/petition/38960.html


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